Cultural heritage and cultural historical environment

The world heritage area West Norwegian Fjords has a very rich collection of cultural heritage and intact historical cultural environments. The depth of cultural history, or continuity, is safeguarded through knowledge of operational methods that are still kept alive in the local community.

Common to all the cultural heritage sites is that they help visualise the access to and use of localised resources in the area. It is very important to take care of the time dimension and the context of...

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Cultural heritage landscape and agriculture

The West Norwegian Fjords world heritage area includes rich and varied cultural landscapes. This landscape has to a large degree been shaped by agriculture, historically, and through activities in modern times. Many of the qualities of the experience are also associated with the cultural historical landscape.

West Norwegian Fjords have particularly dramatic and magnificent scenery. But it is primarily the interaction between the natural and the cultural historical landscape, the experience...

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Municipal sector plan area

The West Norwegian Fjords world heritage area also includes an area that is not protected under the Natural Environment Protection Act, but which is managed through regulation plans and municipal sector plans. The area mainly includes residential areas and a sea area inside the world heritage object.

Residential areas that are inside the boundaries of the world heritage property must be managed in such a way that natural and cultural heritage values are not impaired. It is very important to...

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Protected waterways in the world heritage area

The waterways are important elements of the landscape in the world heritage area. Along the world heritage fjord there are many smaller watercourses that make spectacular cascades and waterfalls. Water and waterways have always been important localisation factors for settlements and travel in the area that is the world heritage area West Norwegian Fjords.

The quaternary geological processes associated with untouched rivers are a central element to the application for world heritage status...

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Management authority and control

The responsibility for general management of the different protected areas is often shared between centralised and local authorities. From 2010, municipalities that include areas of national parks and larger protected areas have had the option of taking over management responsibility. They also take over management responsibility for nature reserves that are fully surrounded by national parks/protected landscape areas.

The management authorities must primarily enforce the protection...

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Management plan

Two management plans have been prepared for West Norwegian Fjords, one for the Geirangerfjord area (North) and one for the Nærøyfjord area (South). The link to these plans is given below.

The management plans are intended to create a basis for positive development in the world heritage area, which secures the natural and cultural values. A management plan for a protected area is supposed to promote the objective of the protection. The management plan must provide further guidelines for...

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Management

In the world heritage area of West Norwegian Fjords the overarching objective is to secure the area's natural and cultural value. The area also includes residential areas, and it is important that management also provides good conditions for further settlement and business activities, without adversely affecting the protected values. The world heritage area West Norwegian Fjords is managed by several public offices.

The common term for the regulated area that the world heritage area...

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